Implant Restoration

Implant Restoration

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor. Restoration is a term used in dentistry to describe restoring the function of the tooth by replacing missing or damaged tooth structure.

The primary use of dental implants are to support dental prosthetics. Modern dental implants make use of osseointegration, the biologic process where bone fuses tightly to the surface of specific materials such as titanium and some ceramics. The integration of implant and bone can support physical loads for decades without failure. The implant fixture is first placed, so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic.

For an implant to become permanently stable, the body must grow bone to the surface of the implant (osseointegration). Based on this biologic process, it was thought that loading an implant during the osseointegration period would result in movement that would prevent osseointegration, and thus increase implant failure rates. As a result, three to six months of integrating time (depending on various factors) was allowed before placing the teeth on implants (restoring them).

However, later research suggests that the initial stability of the implant in bone is a more important determinant of success of implant integration, rather than a certain period of healing time. As a result, the time allowed to heal is typically based on the density of bone the implant is placed in and the number of implants splinted together, rather than a uniform amount of time. When implants can withstand high torque (35 Ncm) and are splinted to other implants, there are no meaningful differences in long-term implant survival or bone loss between implants loaded immediately, at three months, or at six months. The corollary is that single implants, even in solid bone, require a period of no-load to minimize the risk of initial failure.

After placement, implants need to be cleaned (similar to natural teeth) with a Teflon instrument to remove any plaque. Because of the more precarious blood supply to the gingiva, care should be taken with dental floss. Implants will lose bone at a rate similar to natural teeth in the mouth (e.g. if someone suffers from periodontal disease, an implant can be affected by a similar disorder) but will otherwise last. The porcelain on crowns should be expected to discolour, fracture or require repair approximately every ten years, although there is significant variation in the service life of dental crowns based on the position in the mouth, the forces being applied from opposing teeth and the restoration material. Where implants are used to retain a complete denture, depending on the type of attachment, connections need to be changed or refreshed every one to two years. A powered irrigator may also be useful for cleaning around implants.

To schedule an appointment, please call

Call: 919-866-3200

Contact us

Call Us

919-866-3200

Fax

919-854-4866

Email Us

CaryOffice@HowarthDental.com

Our Location

Howarth Family Dental Center 530 New Waverly Pl, Suite 302 Cary, NC 27518

Get in touch

Our practice & COVID-19 information

To Our Most Valued Patients:
 
Starting Monday, March 23, 2020, and continuing until further notice, we must implement new restrictions on patient care. This is based on the latest advice we have received from the Centers for Disease Control, the NC Dental Board and the American Dental Association. 
 
If you have an appointment at Howarth Family Dental Center for non-emergency dental treatment (such as a checkup or cleaning or fillings), the appointment has been canceled, and we will work with you to reschedule. We are now restricting treatment to urgent or emergency care only.
 
This decision was not easy, but necessary. The health and well-being of our patients and team members are our primary focus. We will continue to be available for urgent and emergency care.    
If you should have a true dental emergency, you can contact a member of our team by calling our office at 919-866-3200. Please be patient as it may take us a little longer to respond. We will also send updates via text and email as needed during the situation at hand.
 
We regret that we must restrict our patient care this way. We are serving our patients in the safest manner possible by following the advice of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention under these difficult circumstances. In doing this, we will safeguard the health and safety of our patients, our team members, and the entire community. Thank you all for your cooperation and understanding during these trying times and we wish you all the best of health.
 
In Good Health,
Dr. Gregg Howarth & Staff

You have Successfully Subscribed!